Here Ye Be Deer (And Other Things To Shoot At)

The Sportsman’s Map Of Wisconsin shows you where the deer are. Well, the maps shows you where the deer — Pheasant, Prairie Chickens, rabbits, ducks and fish — were, as these are vintage maps from the 1940s.

From my auction listing:

This auction is for two vintage maps for sportsmen looking to find the best hunting spots in Wisconsin.

According to the one with the original cover, these maps were “based on aerial pictures and State of Wisconsin highway county maps.” Offering “detailed information on fishing, hunting boating, resorts, and recreation.” Elsewhere on one of the maps, as statement that the Sportsman’s Map was also based on aerial photos and info from the Wis. Forest Service, U.S.G.S. Quadrangles, as well as “authoritative sources” compiled by The Star Map Service. The maps shows you where the deer, pheasant, Prairie Chickens, rabbits, ducks, fish were.

Neither map is pristine. One has both front and back cover pieces, but the front piece is no longer attached. It seems in good shape, a few tears. The second has no front cover, the map is torn along folds, yellowing tape is present and even it fails to hold pieces together. What I’m trying to say is that there are enormous signs of wear — but these were used in the field, ya know what I mean? Just be glad there’s nothing icky left on them like fingerprints from grubby bait-holding hands, or guts or anything *wink* — and be glad these vintage maps survived at all.

The map in worse shape, is for “Section IV,” Marinette, Oconto, Door, Kewaunee, Brown, Calumet, Manitowoc, Winnebago, Outagamie, and parts of Shawano and Waupaca Counties. This appears to be the first of this series of maps as it bears the following statement: Sportsmen Attention Other sections of Wisconsin will be available shortly. Star Map Service, Milwaukee, Wis. It is dated 1946.

The other map, in nice shape, is for “Section IX,” Fon du Lac, Sheboygan, Dodge, Washington, Ozaukee, Jefferson, Waukesha, Milwaukee, Walworth, Racine, and Kenosha Counties. I did not spot any date on this one, but I didn’t want to fiddle too much with them… Best guess as to age lies in the fact that one the side of the map with traditional road map, there is a note that the population figures came from the 1940 Census — this is also on the IV map.

Nanette The Hungry Pelican

From Nanette The Hungry Pelican, by William Wise, illustrated by Winifred Lubell, published by Rand McNally, copyright 1969. (My copy a First Printing, February 1969 is now for sale.)

Mrs. Peabody Fitch
Was terribly rich,
And her house was as big as a mountain.

It had beautiful trees,
And a garden with bees,
And goldfish that swam in a fountain.

I guess we know where Nanette comes in…

I Scream, You Scream For Hoot Hoot Ice Cream

Naturally, the Hoot Hoot I Scream sold ice cream. According to Future Studio, the Hoot Hoot was a real recycling project:

The head rotated; the eyes, made from Buick headlamps, blinked; the sign: Hoot hoot, I scream, used elements of a theater marquee. For over 50 years, Tillie Hattrup ran this L.A.-area refreshment spot designed and built by her husband, Roy in 1926-27. It was demolished in 1979.

More info on the building, with additional digital recreation images, can be found here.

I found this photo via Old Chum when I found these other classic roadside attraction food stand photos. Old Chum (aka Walter Manning of the Old Faithful Shop) says they are from California Crazy: Roadside Vervancular Architecture, compiled by Jim Heimann and Rip Georges; more pics here at his other blog.